Herbal Healing

This blog is dedicated to herbal healing and other natural health remedies. In an attempt to deepen my own knowledge, I will share information on a variety of herbs, focusing largely on easy to find Western plants, as well as methods for preparing herbal medicines and natural beauty treatments. I am not a certified herbalist, licensed cosmetologist, or physician, so please use the information on this blog at your own risk! I've been an aspiring herbalist for several years, and I hope to finally get my certification sometime this year.

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)
Parts used: Leaves
Benefits and uses: The warming, aromatic constituents of basil help to calm the nervous system; settle the stomach; clear the mind; and fight off coughs, colds, flu and allergies.  The magnitude of basil’s healing endeavors are reflected in the hundreds of therapeutic applications of this leafy green companion.  Basil is known as the destroyer of phlegm - when you consider the number of ailments that are provoked by excess phlegm (from allergies to asthma to colds), you begin to understand the breadth of basil’s virtue.
Basil is most commonly thought of as part of the tomato sauce or pasta dish, but a cup of basil tea works works wonders on almost any digestive complaint.  Basil tea relieves stomach cramps and spasm, nausea, gas and constipation.  That must be why it’s a primary ingredient in pasta dishes: so you can eat more pasta!  Basil doesn’t qualify as the world’s best tasting tea, but it isn’t so bad, especially when you find out what it can do for your stomach.  Just add a little honey!
Eating more basil in the late summer and early fall helps fend off sinus and bronchial congestion during the winter.  It is also antibacterial and antiviral, making it a helpful remedy for the common cold and flu as well.  If you are prone to such sickness, keep some dried basil and drink the tea several times a week as a preventative remedy.  It warms the body, clears out the lungs, and sharpens the mind.  In the middle of winter when you are feeling cold, dark, damp and depressed, break out your stash of dried basil and let it infuse your day with a little warmth and summer sunshine.

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

Parts used: Leaves

Benefits and uses: The warming, aromatic constituents of basil help to calm the nervous system; settle the stomach; clear the mind; and fight off coughs, colds, flu and allergies.  The magnitude of basil’s healing endeavors are reflected in the hundreds of therapeutic applications of this leafy green companion.  Basil is known as the destroyer of phlegm - when you consider the number of ailments that are provoked by excess phlegm (from allergies to asthma to colds), you begin to understand the breadth of basil’s virtue.

Basil is most commonly thought of as part of the tomato sauce or pasta dish, but a cup of basil tea works works wonders on almost any digestive complaint.  Basil tea relieves stomach cramps and spasm, nausea, gas and constipation.  That must be why it’s a primary ingredient in pasta dishes: so you can eat more pasta!  Basil doesn’t qualify as the world’s best tasting tea, but it isn’t so bad, especially when you find out what it can do for your stomach.  Just add a little honey!

Eating more basil in the late summer and early fall helps fend off sinus and bronchial congestion during the winter.  It is also antibacterial and antiviral, making it a helpful remedy for the common cold and flu as well.  If you are prone to such sickness, keep some dried basil and drink the tea several times a week as a preventative remedy.  It warms the body, clears out the lungs, and sharpens the mind.  In the middle of winter when you are feeling cold, dark, damp and depressed, break out your stash of dried basil and let it infuse your day with a little warmth and summer sunshine.

This is kind of an embarassing question which is why I'm anon. Do you know of any natural remedies for yeast infections?
Anonymous

Girl, don’t be embarrassed!  We all get them at one point or another and they are totally a pain.  Here’s what works for me:

  • At the first sign of an infection, you wash your genitals well with a gentle, unscented soap and water that’s not too hot - this will help with discharge and itching.
  • Garlic has anti-fungal properties, so eat 2 fresh cloves a day on salads or in soups.
  • Plain yogurt helps restore the acid-balance, so you can either eat it or actually apply it externally to the area.
  • Drink unsweetened cranberry juice to help fight off the yeast.  Drinking cranberry juice daily is also a great preventative if you get yeast infections often.
  • In terms of actual herbs that help with yeast infection, go for anti-fungal herbs like basil, thyme and rosemary - you probably have these in your spice rack right now!  Make a tea out of them that you can either drink or apply directly to the genitals.
  • I’ve also heard you can douche with vinegar, but I’ve never tried that, so if none of the other options work, you might want to look into it.
lotus