Herbal Healing

This blog is dedicated to herbal healing and other natural health remedies. In an attempt to deepen my own knowledge, I will share information on a variety of herbs, focusing largely on easy to find Western plants, as well as methods for preparing herbal medicines and natural beauty treatments. I am not a certified herbalist, licensed cosmetologist, or physician, so please use the information on this blog at your own risk! I've been an aspiring herbalist for several years, and I hope to finally get my certification sometime this year.

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) 
Parts used: Roots
Benefits and uses: Valerian is a commonly used herb and is a shining example of why we need to consider plant energetics and individual constitutions as opposed to the “this herb for this condition” mentality. But before we talk about herbal energetics let’s learn a little about this aromatic plant.  Valerian grows readily in gardens and in the wilderness of North America. If you’ve ever been around fresh valerian roots you’ll probably never forget that smell.  Some despise it, likening it to gym socks that haven’t been washed in months. Others, like myself, adore the smell, pungent and vibrant. Thesmell of the roots can be a first step in matching this plant to a particular person. Many herbalists agree: if you don’t like the smell, this plant probably isn’t for you.
Valerian is used extensively for nervousness, insomnia, and muscle spasms, including menstrual cramping. Valerian, however, is not a plant well suited to all people. Rather than relieving nervousness, anxiety, and promoting restful sleep, valerian has been known to stimulate and increase hyperactivity in certain persons.  Michael Moore, in his book Plants of the Pacific Northwest, gives a detailed description of who this plant works best for, and who it doesn’t work for. He explains that because of its tendency to stimulate digestion, lungs, and heart function, it can have adverse effects on people who do not need these systems stimulated.
In The Earthwise Herbal, Matthew Wood gives indications for valerian as cold pallid skin, anemic, and nervous. Lesley Tierra sums it up simply in her book Healing with the Herbs of Life: valerian is a distinctly warming herb, great for those people who suffer from nervousness, insomnia, and muscle spasms due to a cold condition. Valerian is a great herb to promote restful sleeping and does not produce a long list of symptoms common to prescription sedatives. It’s relaxing, yet allows for REM sleep and leaves you feeling refreshed in the morning without grogginess. Of course the effectiveness of valerian, as with all plants, is dependent on the herb matching the person, rather than the condition.
Keep a fresh root tincture of valerian at your bedside for those nights when you can’t seem to keep your mind from racing to a thousand different thoughts.

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis)

Parts used: Roots

Benefits and uses: Valerian is a commonly used herb and is a shining example of why we need to consider plant energetics and individual constitutions as opposed to the “this herb for this condition” mentality. But before we talk about herbal energetics let’s learn a little about this aromatic plant.  Valerian grows readily in gardens and in the wilderness of North America. If you’ve ever been around fresh valerian roots you’ll probably never forget that smell.  Some despise it, likening it to gym socks that haven’t been washed in months. Others, like myself, adore the smell, pungent and vibrant. Thesmell of the roots can be a first step in matching this plant to a particular person. Many herbalists agree: if you don’t like the smell, this plant probably isn’t for you.

Valerian is used extensively for nervousness, insomnia, and muscle spasms, including menstrual cramping. Valerian, however, is not a plant well suited to all people. Rather than relieving nervousness, anxiety, and promoting restful sleep, valerian has been known to stimulate and increase hyperactivity in certain persons.  Michael Moore, in his book Plants of the Pacific Northwest, gives a detailed description of who this plant works best for, and who it doesn’t work for. He explains that because of its tendency to stimulate digestion, lungs, and heart function, it can have adverse effects on people who do not need these systems stimulated.

In The Earthwise Herbal, Matthew Wood gives indications for valerian as cold pallid skin, anemic, and nervous. Lesley Tierra sums it up simply in her book Healing with the Herbs of Life: valerian is a distinctly warming herb, great for those people who suffer from nervousness, insomnia, and muscle spasms due to a cold condition. Valerian is a great herb to promote restful sleeping and does not produce a long list of symptoms common to prescription sedatives. It’s relaxing, yet allows for REM sleep and leaves you feeling refreshed in the morning without grogginess. Of course the effectiveness of valerian, as with all plants, is dependent on the herb matching the person, rather than the condition.

Keep a fresh root tincture of valerian at your bedside for those nights when you can’t seem to keep your mind from racing to a thousand different thoughts.

  1. angelanhunt reblogged this from herbalhealing
  2. illogicalrabbit reblogged this from herbalhealing
  3. dualpsiisprite reblogged this from herbalhealing
  4. jmonii reblogged this from herbalhealing
  5. notime4yourshit reblogged this from herbalhealing
  6. maxmaxmaaaax reblogged this from herbalhealing
  7. lunadiable reblogged this from herbalhealing
  8. antique-soul reblogged this from herbalhealing
  9. thebirdvsthelion reblogged this from herbalhealing
  10. mustyherbalhart reblogged this from herbalhealing
  11. herbalhealing posted this
lotus